Tag Archives: Indian Author

An Interesting Combination of Philosophy + Twisted Thriller From a Debut Author | ARC Review: Greed Lust Addiction by Ravi Dabral

The book covers the journey and encounters of an investigative journalist, thrillingly revealing mysteries of the corrupt material world, who believes in following the virtuous, righteous and spiritual path in life but is lured by a society dominated by corrupt politicians, unscrupulous greedy businessmen, puppet media, insensitive police, and even a biased judiciary. It leaves the readers wondering: Will the protagonist survive in the midst of the powerful lobbies who have scant regard for human life? Or will he be crushed like a beetle under a booted foot, as everyone predicts? Or will he be able to stand up just with the help of a handful of yogis of the Himalayan ashrams and their spiritual followers?

The book talks about Materialism Vs Spiritualism. Materialism is the mantra of the modern generation, whose motto is to ‘eat, drink and be merry’. This philosophy gives rise to ‘greed, lust and addiction’ which are vices within us. As against this, spiritualism believes in having ‘virtues, values and morals’ to live a contented, stress-free and purposeful life.

Continue reading An Interesting Combination of Philosophy + Twisted Thriller From a Debut Author | ARC Review: Greed Lust Addiction by Ravi Dabral

A Visceral Emotional Retelling in Sita’s Words | ARC Review: The Forest of Enchantments by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

The Ramayana, one of the world’s greatest epics, is also a tragic love story. In this brilliant retelling, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni places Sita at the centre of the novel: this is Sita’s version.

The Forest of Enchantments is also a very human story of some of the other women in the epic, often misunderstood and relegated to the margins: Kaikeyi, Surpanakha, Mandodari. A powerful comment on duty, betrayal, infidelity and honour, it is also about women’s struggle to retain autonomy in a world that privileges men, as Chitra transforms an ancient story into a gripping, contemporary battle of wills.

While the Ramayana resonates even today, she makes it more relevant than ever, in the underlying questions in the novel: How should women be treated by their loved ones? What are their rights in a relationship? When does a woman need to stand up and say, ‘Enough!’

Continue reading A Visceral Emotional Retelling in Sita’s Words | ARC Review: The Forest of Enchantments by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

Excerpt Reveal: Tarikshir: The Awakening by Khayaal Patel

Today, on the blog, I have a little sneak peak into quite the fascinating and engrossing historical fantasy fiction debut by author Khayaal Patel. Do check out the Excerpt and don’t forget to grab a copy for yourself. I promise that you won’t be disappointed!

Continue reading Excerpt Reveal: Tarikshir: The Awakening by Khayaal Patel

Excerpt Reveal: Tarikshir: The Awakening by Khayaal Patel

Today, on the blog, I have a little sneak peak into quite the fascinating and engrossing historical fantasy fiction debut by author Khayaal Patel. Do check out the Excerpt and don’t forget to grab a copy for yourself. I promise that you won’t be disappointed!

Continue reading Excerpt Reveal: Tarikshir: The Awakening by Khayaal Patel

ARC Review: Wake Up, Girl by Niharika Jindal

Naina is back from America, after four years of living on her own. A natural rebel, she has had some fairly life-altering experiences which Mum and Dad would not approve of at all if they get to know. But will her spirit and her stand be enough to fight the forces of parental pressure and heckling aunties baying for her nuptials?

Back in the bosom of her conservative family, Naina cannot even begin to imagine the turn her life is going to take. It’s wedding season, and she must now be married. Because every self-respecting upper-middle-class family in India do that, right? Marriage at the ‘right age’ to the ‘right family’…whether she likes it or not.

Naina’s worst nightmares are about to come true. What hits her within a week of being at home completely changes her world and her life as she embarks on a journey that will define her and provide her an education that only life can.

Ayaan, Rohan, Akshay, Shiven. Who will it be? Will she even have a shot at romance, being with someone she loves, irrespective of his caste, respectability or bank balance? She will have to summon all the chutzpah within to fight for herself. For her notions of love and living.

Will she succeed? Like a chrysalis unfolding, will Naina, too, emerge with her wings unscathed?

Continue reading ARC Review: Wake Up, Girl by Niharika Jindal

ARC Review: City of My Heart by Rana Safvi

In September 1857, the Indian way of life changed for ever, after the overnight downfall of the Mughal Dynasty, with the capture and exile of Bahadur Shah Zafar. This book, translated by Safvi, presents translations of four texts that talk about Dilli (today, Delhi) on the eve of the downfall and the fate of royalty following the uprising of 1857. Invoking nostalgia, chronicling both beauty and hardships, it is a gemstone to understand exactly how the royal household functioned and how it ceased to be.

Continue reading ARC Review: City of My Heart by Rana Safvi

ARC Review: Don’t Tell The Governor by Ravi Subramanian

On 8 November, when the clock strikes 12, your money will be no good. Somewhere on the India-Nepal Border, a car full of passengers swerves off a highway and plunges into a valley, its trunk full of cash.

In the UK, a Bollywood starlet wins Big Survivor, the most popular reality TV show in the country. In Panama, Central America, a whistle-blower at a law firm brings down billionaires across the globe.

And in India, a new RBI Governor is appointed. Aditya Kesavan is dynamic, charismatic and ambitious. And he’s been handed the reins of the RBI on a platter. His only job: to make sure he doesn’t rock the boat. But, unknown to him, the wheels have begun to turn, as the country heads towards the biggest financial event in modern Indian history.

Governor Kesavan is about to carry out the most brazen act of his life – and, perhaps, his most foolish. Will he be able to pull himself out of the mess he has got into or will he have to surrender to the manipulative forces behind the scenes? Running desperately out of time, the Governor must set things right.

Continue reading ARC Review: Don’t Tell The Governor by Ravi Subramanian

ARC Review: Love, Take Two by Saranya Rai

She’s tall, beautiful and one of Bollywood’s leading ladies.
He’s goofy, loves to wear outlandish clothes and is constantly getting into trouble with reporters.
When Vicky Behl and Kritika Vadukut meet on the sets of the period drama Ranjha Ranjha, everyone agrees they have serious chemistry–not just on screen. But after her devastating breakup with Raunak Rajput, Kritika doesn’t know if she can handle being with a Bollywood actor. If only Vicky wasn’t so damn charming . . .
Will the pressure and scrutiny of Bollywood allow them to live happily ever?

Continue reading ARC Review: Love, Take Two by Saranya Rai

ARC Review: 19 Till I Die by Anjali Kirpalani

For Zaid from Durban, it was heartbreak. For Fiona, who loves New Delhi, it had always been a dream. Rachna needs this chance to step out of Australia and her comfort zone. Tia from Mumbai sees it as a ticket away from her over-protective parents. The four find themselves at the University of Guelph in Canada. Adventure awaits, and a chance at love lingers amidst the crowds – in the halls, at the bars, on the dancefloor. Some of them will find it. But, as with such powerful life-altering things as love, it’s not going to be easy. It’s too late to turn back to the drab, safe and predictable lives they left behind. Might as well buckle up and hold on tight as they brace themselves for the ride of their lives.

Continue reading ARC Review: 19 Till I Die by Anjali Kirpalani

ARC Review: That Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba Karim

Shabnam Qureshi is a funny, imaginative Pakistani-American teen attending a tony private school in suburban New Jersey. When her feisty best friend, Farah, starts wearing the headscarf without even consulting her, it begins to unravel their friendship. After telling a huge lie about a tragedy that happened to her family during the Partition of India in 1947, Shabnam is ready for high school to end. She faces a summer of boredom and regret, but she has a plan: Get through the summer. Get to college. Don’t look back. Begin anew.

Everything changes when she meets Jamie, who scores her a job at his aunt’s pie shack, and meets her there every afternoon. Shabnam begins to see Jamie and herself like the rose and the nightingale of classic Urdu poetry, which, according to her father, is the ultimate language of desire. Jamie finds Shabnam fascinating—her curls, her culture, her awkwardness. Shabnam finds herself falling in love, but Farah finds Jamie worrying.

With Farah’s help, Shabnam uncovers the truth about Jamie, about herself, and what really happened during Partition. As she rebuilds her friendship with Farah and grows closer to her parents, Shabnam learns powerful lessons about the importance of love, in all of its forms.

Featuring complex, Muslim-American characters who defy conventional stereotypes and set against a backdrop of Radiohead’s music and the evocative metaphors of Urdu poetry, THAT THING WE CALL A HEART is a honest, moving story of a young woman’s explorations of first love, sexuality, desire, self-worth, her relationship with her parents, the value of friendship, and what it means to be true.

Continue reading ARC Review: That Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba Karim