Tag Archives: Harper Collins

Ingenuity + Sarcasm + A Psychopathic Murderous AI = A Roller Coaster of a Trilogy | Book Review: The Illuminae Files by Amie KAufman and Jay Kristoff

 

This is the third series I picked for my 2019 Series Challenge – #2019FWSeriesPick – I would love for you all to join me; especially if you have unread series on your shelf like I do 😀

Continue reading Ingenuity + Sarcasm + A Psychopathic Murderous AI = A Roller Coaster of a Trilogy | Book Review: The Illuminae Files by Amie KAufman and Jay Kristoff

Historical Gothic Fiction With an Extra Sprinkling of *HEA* | ARC Review: The Familiars by Stacey Halls

Young Fleetwood Shuttleworth, a noblewoman, is with child again. None of her previous pregnancies have borne fruit, and her husband, Richard, is anxious for an heir. Then Fleetwood discovers a hidden doctor’s letter that carries a dire prediction: she will not survive another birth. By chance she meets a midwife named Alice Grey, who promises to help her deliver a healthy baby. But Alice soon stands accused of witchcraft.

Is there more to Alice than meets the eye? Fleetwood must risk everything to prove her innocence. As the two women’s lives become intertwined, the Witch Trials of 1612 loom. Time is running out; both their lives are at stake. Only they know the truth. Only they can save each other.

Rich and compelling, set against the frenzy of the real Pendle Hill Witch Trials, this novel explores the rights of 17th-century women and raises the question: Was witch-hunting really women-hunting? Fleetwood Shuttleworth, Alice Grey and the other characters are actual historical figures. King James I was obsessed with asserting power over the lawless countryside (even woodland creatures, or “familiars,” were suspected of dark magic) by capturing “witches”—in reality mostly poor and illiterate women.

Continue reading Historical Gothic Fiction With an Extra Sprinkling of *HEA* | ARC Review: The Familiars by Stacey Halls

A Touted Feminist Collection That Falls Way Short of Expectations | ARC Review: Hijabistan by Sabyn

A young kleptomaniac infuses thrill into her suffocating life by using her abaya to steal lipsticks and flash men. An office worker feels empowered through sex, shunning her inhibitions but not her hijab … until she realizes that the real veil is drawn across her desires and not her body. A British-Asian Muslim girl finds herself drawn to the jihad in Syria only to realize the real fight is inside her. A young Pakistani bride in the West asserts her identity through the hijab in her new and unfamiliar surroundings, leading to unexpected consequences. The hijab constricts as it liberates. Not just a piece of garment, it is a worldview, an emblem of the assertion of a Muslim woman’s identity, and equally a symbol of oppression. Set in Pakistan and the UK, this unusual and provocative collection of short stories explores the lives of women crushed under the weight of the all-encompassing veil and those who feel sheltered by it.

Continue reading A Touted Feminist Collection That Falls Way Short of Expectations | ARC Review: Hijabistan by Sabyn

AudioBook Review: A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahareh Mafi

It’s 2002, a year after 9/11. It’s an extremely turbulent time politically, but especially so for someone like Shirin, a sixteen-year-old Muslim girl who’s tired of being stereotyped.

Shirin is never surprised by how horrible people can be. She’s tired of the rude stares, the degrading comments—even the physical violence—she endures as a result of her race, her religion, and the hijab she wears every day. So she’s built up protective walls and refuses to let anyone close enough to hurt her. Instead, she drowns her frustrations in music and spends her afternoons break-dancing with her brother.

But then she meets Ocean James. He’s the first person in forever who really seems to want to get to know Shirin. It terrifies her—they seem to come from two irreconcilable worlds—and Shirin has had her guard up for so long that she’s not sure she’ll ever be able to let it down.

Continue reading AudioBook Review: A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahareh Mafi

ARC Review: The Profane: The Poems by Saranjit Sarna

‘The Profane is a note from the underground, a message being sent from an island on fire, an email shot off at three in the morning. This is to say that Sarna’s book is one of vulnerability, loneliness, joy, humour, hope and grief. It’s a human book which tells us it’s okay to be human.’ – Matthew Dickman ‘Sarna has something rich and meaningful to communicate, and the lyric sensibility, love of language, beat and rhyme, and inventive zest to bring alive on the page all the vividness and pleasure and plangency of life. This is a book to savour and treasure for all the years it will stand on your shelf.’ – Chandrahas Choudhury A witches’ brew of art, politics, religion and mythology, The Profane is rich with music and images. Here are poems of heartbreak and disillusion, of loneliness and mortality, but also of passion for life on earth, in all its mud and glory. In the pages of this collection, Kurt Cobain, Napoleon and Amir Khusro meet, and Homeric tough guys get what they deserve. Satyajit Sarna’s vision embraces our broken world and salutes the one chance we get to experience it.

Continue reading ARC Review: The Profane: The Poems by Saranjit Sarna

ARC Review – Uncool: Fights, Camera, Action by Jane De Suza

So, I’m DD and I’m going to be rich and famous because I’m making a film on (hold the phone still, will ya?) high school life. All the secrets, fights, crazy exam pressure, brainiacs and show offs (not you, not you!). Only, everyone wants to be the star (hey you, get out off the frame!). It’s got drama and hysterics, historics, sorry, histrionics. And my mom’s got Mr Horns. And I still haven’t got a boyfriend or a dog. And then, the lurker appears. And it all gets super scary. And he’s coming closer – so I’ve gotta run. Fast. Bye! See ya inside! The first book of the bitingly funny UNCOOL series – a rib-tickling tackling of teen issues!

Continue reading ARC Review – Uncool: Fights, Camera, Action by Jane De Suza

ARC Review: I Was Born For This by Alice Oseman

For Angel Rahimi, life is only about one thing: The Ark – a pop-rock trio of teenage boys who are currently taking the world by storm. Being part of The Ark’s fandom has given her everything – her friendships, her dreams, her place in the world.

Jimmy Kaga-Ricci owes everything to The Ark too. He’s their frontman – and playing in a band is all he’s ever dreamed of doing. It’s just a shame that recently everything in his life seems to have turned into a bit of a nightmare.

Because that’s the problem with dreaming – eventually, inevitably, real life arrives with a wake-up call. And when Angel and Jimmy are unexpectedly thrust together, they will discover just how strange and surprising facing up to reality can be.

Continue reading ARC Review: I Was Born For This by Alice Oseman

ARC Review: Every Last Lie by Mary Kubica

New York Times bestselling author of THE GOOD GIRL, Mary Kubica is back with another exhilarating thriller as a widow’s pursuit of the truth leads her to the darkest corners of the psyche. 

“The bad man, Daddy. The bad man is after us.” 

Clara Solberg’s world shatters when her husband and their four-year-old daughter are in a car crash, killing Nick while Maisie is remarkably unharmed. The crash is ruled an accident…until the coming days, when Maisie starts having night terrors that make Clara question what really happened on that fateful afternoon.

Tormented by grief and her obsession that Nick’s death was far more than just an accident, Clara is plunged into a desperate hunt for the truth. Who would have wanted Nick dead? And, more important, why? Clara will stop at nothing to find out—and the truth is only the beginning of this twisted tale of secrets and deceit.

Told in the alternating perspectives of Clara’s investigation and Nick’s last months leading up to the crash, master of suspense Mary Kubica weaves her most chilling thriller to date—one that explores the dark recesses of a mind plagued by grief and shows that some secrets might be better left buried.

Continue reading ARC Review: Every Last Lie by Mary Kubica

ARC Review: Not If I See You First by Eric Lindstrom

The Rules: 

Don’t deceive me. Ever. Especially using my blindness. Especially in public.

Don’t help me unless I ask. Otherwise you’re just getting in my way or bothering me.

Don’t be weird. Seriously, other than having my eyes closed all the time, I’m just like you only smarter. 

Parker Grant doesn’t need 20/20 vision to see right through you. That’s why she created the Rules: Don’t treat her any differently just because she’s blind, and never take advantage. There will be no second chances. Just ask Scott Kilpatrick, the boy who broke her heart.

When Scott suddenly reappears in her life after being gone for years, Parker knows there’s only one way to react-shun him so hard it hurts. She has enough on her mind already, like trying out for the track team (that’s right, her eyes don’t work but her legs still do), doling out tough-love advice to her painfully naive classmates, and giving herself gold stars for every day she hasn’t cried since her dad’s death three months ago. But avoiding her past quickly proves impossible, and the more Parker learns about what really happened–both with Scott, and her dad–the more she starts to question if things are always as they seem. Maybe, just maybe, some Rules are meant to be broken.

Continue reading ARC Review: Not If I See You First by Eric Lindstrom

ARC Review: How To Disappear by Sharon Huss Roat

Vicky Decker has perfected the art of hiding in plain sight, quietly navigating the halls of her high school undetected except by her best (and only) friend, Jenna. But when Jenna moves away, Vicky’s isolation becomes unbearable.

So she decides to invent a social life by Photoshopping herself into other people’s pictures, posting them on Instagram under the screen name Vicurious. Instantly, she begins to get followers, so she adds herself to more photos from all over the world with all types of people. And as Vicurious’s online followers multiply, Vicky realizes she can make a whole life for herself without ever leaving her bedroom. But the more followers she finds online, the clearer it becomes that there are a lot of people out there who feel like her— #alone and #ignored in real life.

To help them, and herself, Vicky must find the courage to face her fear of being “seen,” because only then can she stop living vicariously and truly bring the magic of Vicurious to life.

In this beautiful and illuminating narrative, Sharon Huss Roat shines a light on our love of social media and how sometimes being the person you think you want to be isn’t as great as being the person you truly are.

Continue reading ARC Review: How To Disappear by Sharon Huss Roat